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EBOOK
Author Barron, Anne.
Title Public information messages : a contrastive genre analysis of state-citizen communication / by Anne Barron.
Imprint Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : John Benjamins Pub. Co., 2012.

Author Barron, Anne.
Series Pragmatics & Beyond New Series (P & BNS) ; 222
Subject Pragmatics -- Cross-cultural studies.
Speech acts (Linguistics) -- Cross-cultural studies.
Mass media -- Social aspects -- Germany.
Mass media -- Social aspects -- Ireland.
Public relations -- Germany.
Public relations -- Ireland.
Genre/Form Electronic books.
Cross-cultural studies.
Description 1 online resource (pages).
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary Public information messages are an important means of state-citizen communication in today's societies. Using this genre, citizens are directed to "never ever drink and drive", to "slow down" and to "learn to say no". Yet, this book presents the first in-depth analysis of public information messages from a linguistic perspective, and indeed also from a cross-cultural perspective. Specifically, the study, adopting genre analysis, contrasts a corpus of state-run national public information campaigns in Germany and Ireland. A taxonomy of moves is developed inductively and the interactional features of the genre are analysed and related to the context of use. The comprehensive discussion of theoretical and methodological issues, the in-depth analysis and the extensive bibliography make this book of interest to researchers and students in (contrastive) discourse analysis, (cross-cultural) pragmatics, contrastive rhetoric, advertising, social psychology, mass communication and media studies. Copy-writers will also profit from the insights gained, particularly within the context of an increase in Europe-wide public information campaigns.
Contents Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 Introduction -- ch. 2 Genre analysis -- 2.1. Sketching genre -- 2.2. Genre -- the status of communicative purpose -- 2.3. Genres situated in specific context of use -- 2.4. Genre integrity and dynamism -- 2.5. Super genres, genres, sub-genres -- 2.6. Comparing genres across cultures -- 2.6.1. Contrastive genre analysis -- 2.6.2. Culture: Definition and operationalisation -- 2.6.3. Researching social culture: Language use in Germany and Ireland -- 2.6.4. Researching mental culture: Values and beliefs in Germany and Ireland -- ch. 3 genre perspective on public information messages -- 3.1. Characterising public information campaigns -- 3.1.1. Categories of public information messages -- 3.1.2. Characterising the context of use -- 3.2. Public information messages: State of the art -- 3.2.1. framework for developing public information campaigns -- 3.2.2. macro-textual perspective -- ch. 4 Methodology -- 4.1. Corpus design -- 4.1.1. Balance and contemporaneousness -- 4.1.2. Size -- 4.2. Corpus compilation procedures -- 4.3. Genre analysis: Focus and methods of analysis -- 4.3.1. Determining the categories of analysis -- 4.3.2. Coding moves: Questions of validity -- 4.3.3. Procedures of analysis -- ch. 5 Move structure and move register -- 5.1. Capture attention -- 5.2. Give audience details of recent/upcoming changes -- 5.3. Detail strategies for participation -- 5.4. Justify change -- 5.4.1. Claim change is good -- 5.4.2. Detail problematic situation -- 5.4.3. Detail benefits of change -- 5.5. Incite audience participation -- 5.5.1. Underline self-efficacy -- 5.5.2. Underline responsibility to participate -- 5.5.3. Address social behavioural norms -- 5.5.4. Threaten negative consequences -- 5.6. Solicit further action -- 5.6.1. Solicit topic-related action -- 5.6.2. Offer further information/service -- 5.7. Establish credibility -- 5.8. Summary: Move structure and register -- ch. 6 Personalising the impersonal: A micro-textual analysis -- 6.1. Analysing the construction of sender-addressee interaction -- 6.2. Addressing the target audience -- 6.2.1. Second person pronominal reference -- 6.2.2. Inclusive we -- 6.2.3. Directives -- 6.2.4. Questions -- 6.2.5. Addressee lexical reference -- 6.2.6. Non-verbal means of identifying the addressee -- 6.3. Constructing a common context -- 6.3.1. Impersonal reference -- 6.3.2. Deictic reference -- 6.3.3. Interpersonal discourse markers and tag questions -- 6.4. Creating sender visibility -- 6.4.1. Reference to the authority responsible for / supporting the campaign -- 6.4.2. Exclusive we -- 6.5. Summary: Constructing personalised interaction -- ch. 7 Public information messages: A contrastive focus -- 7.1. global perspective of analysis -- 7.2. Public information messages across cultures -- 7.3. Public information messages -- "just" advertising? -- ch. 8 Conclusion -- 8.1. Summarising the findings -- 8.2. Implications -- 8.3. Directions for future research -- Bibliography -- Appendix -- 10.1. Transcription conventions -- 10.2. Communicative moves, sub-moves and strategies in public information messages.
ISBN 9027273405 (electronic bk.)
9789027273406 (electronic bk.)
9789027256270 (hb ; alk. paper)
9027256276 (hb ; alk. paper)
1283548976
9781283548977
OCLC # 811320529
Additional Format Print version: 9789027256270 9027256276 (DLC) 2012022407