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Author King, Shannon (Associate professor),
Title Whose Harlem is this, anyway? : community politics and grassroots activism during the new Negro era / Shannon King.
Imprint New York : New York University Press, 2015.

Series Culture, Labor, History
Culture, labor, history.
Subject African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Politics and government -- 20th century.
New York (N.Y.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
New York (N.Y.) -- Politics and government -- 20th century.
New York (N.Y.) -- Race relations.
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- Politics and government -- 20th century.
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- Race relations.
Description 1 online resource.
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents The making of the Negro mecca: Harlem and the struggle for community rights -- Not to save the union but to free the slaves: Black labor activism and community politics during the new Negro era -- Colored people have few places to which they can move: tenants, landlords, and community mobilization -- Maintaining a high class of respectability in Negro neighborhoods: contestation and congregation in Harlem's geography of vice and leisure during the Prohibition Era -- Demand the dismissal of policemen who abuse the privileges of their uniform: racial violence, police brutality, and self-protection -- Conclusion.
Summary The Harlem of the early twentieth century was more than just the stage upon which black intellectuals, poets and novelists, and painters and jazz musicians created the New Negro Renaissance. It was also a community of working people and black institutions who combated the daily and structural manifestations of racial, class, and gender inequality within Harlem and across the city. New Negro activists, such as Hubert Harrison and Frank Crosswaith, challenged local forms of economic and racial inequality. Insurgent stay-at-home black mothers took negligent landlords to court, complaining to ma.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9781479866915
1479866911
9781479811274 (cl ; alk. paper)
1479811270
OCLC # 923734914
Additional Format Print version: King, Shannon (Associate professor). Whose Harlem is this, anyway?. New York : New York University Press, 2015 (DLC) 2015001643