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EBOOK
Author Cisneros, Josue David, 1981-
Title The border crossed us : rhetorics of borders, citizenship, and Latina/o identity / Josue David Cisneros ; cover design, Mary Elizabeth Watson.
Imprint Tuscaloosa, Alabama : University Alabama Press, 2013.
©2013

Author Cisneros, Josue David, 1981-
Series Rhetoric, culture, and social critique
Rhetoric, culture, and social critique.
Subject Mexican Americans -- Ethnic identity.
Mexican Americans -- Civil rights -- History.
Citizenship -- Social aspects.
Mexican-American Border Region -- Ethnic relations -- History.
Mexican-American Border Region -- Emigration and immigration.
Alt Name Watson, Mary Elizabeth.
Description 1 online resource (248 pages).
polychrome rdacc
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary "The Border Crossed Us explores efforts to restrict and expand notions of US citizenship as they relate specifically to the US-Mexico border and Latina/o identity"-- Provided by publisher.
"The Border Crossed Us explores efforts to restrict and expand notions of US citizenship as they relate specifically to the US-Mexico border and Latina/o identity. Borders and citizenship go hand in hand. Borders define a nation as a territorial entity and create the parameters for national belonging. But the relationship between borders and citizenship breeds perpetual anxiety over the purported sanctity of the border, the security of a nation, and the integrity of civic identity. In The Border Crossed Us, Josue David Cisneros addresses these themes as they relate to the US-Mexico border, arguing that issues ranging from the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848 to contemporary debates about Latina/o immigration and border security are negotiated rhetorically through public discourse. He explores these rhetorical battles through case studies of specific Latina/o struggles for civil rights and citizenship, including debates about Mexican American citizenship in the 1849 California Constitutional Convention, 1960s Chicana/o civil rights movements, and modern-day immigrant activism. Cisneros posits that borders--both geographic and civic--have crossed and recrossed Latina/o communities throughout history (the book's title derives from the popular activist chant, "We didn't cross the border; the border crossed us!") and that Latina/os in the United States have long contributed to, struggled with, and sought to cross or challenge the borders of belonging, including race, culture, language, and gender. The Border Crossed Us illuminates the enduring significance and evolution of US borders and citizenship, and provides programmatic and theoretical suggestions for the continued study of these critical issues"-- Provided by publisher.
Contents Introduction: On Border Crossings and the Crossing Border -- 1. Negotiating the Border: Race, Coloniality, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century California -- 2. Inhabiting the Border: Radical Rhetoric and Social Movement in 1960s New Mexico -- 3. Rebordering the Nation: Hybrid Rhetoric in the Immigrant Marches of 2006 -- 4. Beyond Borders? Citizenship and Contemporary Latina/o and Immigrant Social Movements -- Conclusion: Denaturalizing Borders and Citizenship.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9780817387235 (e-book)
0817387234 (e-book)
0817318127
9780817318123
9780817318123
OCLC # 874179900
Additional Format Print version: Cisneros, Josue David, 1981- Border crossed us : rhetorics of borders, citizenship, and Latina/o identity. Tuscaloosa, Alabama : University Alabama Press, ©2013 xv, 229 pages Rhetoric, culture, and social critique. 9780817318123


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