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Author Desan, Suzanne, 1957-
Title The family on trial in revolutionary France / Suzanne Desan.
Imprint Berkeley : University of California Press, 2004.

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LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK ACLS HISTORY EBOOKS    ONLINE  
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Author Desan, Suzanne, 1957-
Series Studies on the history of society and culture ; 51
Studies on the history of society and culture ; 51.
Subject Families -- France -- 18th century.
Families -- Political aspects -- France.
Domestic relations -- France -- History -- 18th century.
France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Women.
France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799.
Description 1 online resource (xiv, 456 pages) : illustrations, maps.
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references (pages 337-435) and index.
Contents Freedom of the heart -- The political power of love -- Broken bonds -- "War between brothers and sisters" -- Natural children, abandoned mothers, and emancipated fathers -- What makes a father? -- Reconstituting the social after the terror -- The genesis of the civil code.
Summary In a groundbreaking book that challenges many assumptions about gender and politics in the French Revolution, Suzanne Desan offers an insightful analysis of the ways the Revolution radically redefined the family and its internal dynamics. She shows how revolutionary politics and laws brought about a social revolution within households and created space for thousands of French women and men to reimagine their most intimate relationships. Families negotiated new social practices, including divorce, the reduction of paternal authority, egalitarian inheritance for sons and daughters alike, and the granting of civil rights to illegitimate children. Contrary to arguments that claim the Revolution bound women within a domestic sphere, The Family on Trial maintains that the new civil laws and gender politics offered many women unexpected opportunities to gain power, property, or independence. The family became a political arena, a practical terrain for creating the Republic in day-to-day life. From 1789, citizens across France-sons and daughters, unhappily married spouses and illegitimate children, pamphleteers and moralists, deputies and judges-all disputed how the family should be reformed to remake the new France. They debated how revolutionary ideals and institutions should transform the emotional bonds, gender dynamics, legal customs, and economic arrangements that structured the family. They asked how to bring the principles of liberty, equality, and regeneration into the home. And as French citizens confronted each other in the home, in court, and in print, they gradually negotiated new domestic practices that balanced Old Regime customs with revolutionary innovations in law and culture. In a narrative that combines national-level analysis with a case study of family contestation in Normandy, Desan explores these struggles to bring politics into households and to envision and put into practice a new set of familial relationships.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9780520939769 (electronic bk.)
052093976X (electronic bk.)
141752040X (electronic bk.)
9781417520404 (electronic bk.)
1597346128
9781597346122
9786612358494
6612358491
9780520238596
0520238591
9780520248168
0520248163
1282358499
9781282358492
OCLC # 55748311
Additional Format Print version: Desan, Suzanne, 1957- Family on trial in revolutionary France. Berkeley : University of California Press, 2004 0520238591 (DLC) 2003014269 (OCoLC)52514359


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