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Conference Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (18th : 2014 : Purdue University)
Title Inquiries in Hispanic linguistics : from theory to empirical evidence / edited by Alejandro Cuza, Lori Czerwionka, Daniel Olson.
Imprint Amsterdam : Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, [2016]

Conference Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (18th : 2014 : Purdue University)
Series Issues in hispanic and lusophone linguistics, 2213-3887 ; 12
Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone linguistics ; 12.
Subject Spanish language -- Congresses.
Languages in contact -- Congresses.
Language acquisition -- Congresses.
Alt Name Cuza, Alejandro,
Czerwionka, Lori,
Olson, Daniel J.,
Add Title Proceedings of the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium 2014
HLS2014
Conference Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (18th : 2014 : Purdue University)
Series Issues in hispanic and lusophone linguistics, 2213-3887 ; 12
Issues in Hispanic and Lusophone linguistics ; 12.
Subject Spanish language -- Congresses.
Languages in contact -- Congresses.
Language acquisition -- Congresses.
Alt Name Cuza, Alejandro,
Czerwionka, Lori,
Olson, Daniel J.,
Add Title Proceedings of the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium 2014
HLS2014
Description 1 online resource
Note "This collection of peer-reviewed research papers originated from the 18th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, hosted by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, in the School of Languages and Cultures at Purdue University in November of 2014. The Hispanic Linguistics Symposium has emerged as the foremost international conference for the study of Spanish and Portuguese linguistics."
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index.
Note Print version record and CIP data provided by publisher.
Contents 3.3.2 Syntactic factors -- 3.3.2.1 Presence of intervening material. Material that intervenes between the matrix verb and the subject or verb of the CC is expected to reflect an increase in the complexity ("heaviness") of and the distance between the syntactic constituents MC and C -- 3.3.2.2 Grammatical person. I coded grammatical person as first person singular or plural, second person singular, and third person singular or plural in the MC and CC. First person is expected to favor the prosodic integration of CCs in both languages gi -- 3.3.2.3 Subject expression. This factor includes the variants: Null (unexpressed) -- Personal pronoun (English: 'I', 'you', 'he/she/it', 'we', 'they' -- Spanish: yo (I), tu/vos/usted (you), el/ella (he/she), nosotros/as (we), ellos/as (them), ustedes (you all -- 3.3.2.4 Expression of complementizer. I expect the expression of 'that' in English, as in Example 14 below, will favor the appearance of a CC in a different IU from the MC given that the presence of the complementizer that "serves to demarcate the boundar -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Analysis of semantic integration of MC + CC constructions -- 4.2 Results of multivariate analysis -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix -- Generalized gradability and extremeness in Puerto Rican Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 2.1 Gradability -- 2.2 Extremeness -- 3. Lexicalization of extremeness in Puerto Rican Spanish -- 3.1 Properties -- 3.2 Quantity -- 3.3 Prototypical -- 3.4 Action/event -- 4. Gradability and events -- 5. A formal model for event gradability -- 5.1 Generalized gradability -- 5.2 The measurement operator -- 5.3 Generalized extremeness -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- On the mistaken identity of negated epistemics -- 1. Background and introduction -- 2. Properties of subjunctive complement clauses.
Intro -- Inquiries in Hispanic Linguistics -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Towards a theory of assertion structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Focus in Caribbean Spanish -- 2.1 A bi-clausal analysis of FCS -- 2.2 Pseudoclefts, FCS and the bi-clausal analysis -- 2.3 Structural constraints on FCS -- 3. Higher focus: Optional expletives -- 3.1 Meaning of OEs -- 3.2 FCS and OEs revisited -- 4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Towards a theory of pronominal verb constructions in Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Empirical motivation for defective heads -- 2.1 Unaccusative PVCs and expletive Voice -- 2.2 Unergative PVCs and antipassive Voice -- 2.3 Transitive PVCs and defective P -- 3. Marking defective heads -- 3.1 Why [ϕ]? -- 3.2 Why SE? -- 3.3 Why T? -- 4. Conclusions -- 4.1 Valency reduction -- 4.2 Case absorption -- 4.3 Lexical aspect -- Acknowledgments -- References -- On the grammaticality of recomplementation in Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Recomplementation in Spanish -- 3. The study -- 3.1 Research questions -- 3.2 Participants -- 3.3 Methods and design -- 4. Results -- 5. Discussion -- References -- Synchronic change in a multidialectal Spanish community -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Grammatical change and Minimalism -- 3. Subjects in Mainland and Caribbean Spanish -- 4. Grammatical changes in the Spanish spoken by Cuban speakers in Miami -- 5. Discussion and conclusions -- References -- Exploring the syntax-semantics-prosody interface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Prosody and clausal complementation -- 3. Corpora and the variable context -- 3.1 Corpora -- 3.2 Variable context -- 3.2.1 Quotative matrix verbs -- 3.2.2 Formulaic, fixed expressions -- 3.2.3 Non-declaratives -- 3.2.4 Unclear, truncated -- 3.3 Method: Semantic and syntactic factors -- 3.3.1 Semantic factors.
2.1 Properties shared by all negation-triggered subjunctive clauses -- 2.2 Properties shared by subjunctive complements to negated epistemics and emotives -- 3. p vs. F level predicates -- 4. The dual status of negation -- 5. Negation: Different scope configurations for F vs. p level predicates -- 6. The unboundedness of negation-triggered subjunctive complements -- 6.1 A formal notion of boundedness: Giorgi and Pianesi (1997) -- 6.2 On the (un)boundedness of subjunctive complements -- 6.3 Anti-veridicality and (un)boundedness -- 6.4 Durative modification in presupposed contexts -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- The mestizo speech -- 1. A framework for the discussion -- 2. Participants' selection criteria -- 2.1 Different approaches to the reality of multilingual speakers -- 2.2 An example: Perception of English corrective focus by L1 Inuktitut speakers -- 3. Task choice -- 3.1 Speech and writing -- 3.2 Orthography and the acquisition of segments -- 3.3 Task choices and the acquisition of intonation -- 4. Discussion -- 4.1 Experimental responses to the study of multilingual participants -- 4.2 Insights from cultural studies -- 5. Concluding remarks -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Stressed clitics in Argentine Spanish -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Stressed clitics in Argentine Spanish -- 3. Phonological characteristics of clitics -- 4. Current study -- 4.1 Predictions -- 5. Methodology -- 5.1 Data -- 5.2 Data analysis -- 6. Results -- 6.1 Duration -- 6.2 Pitch -- 6.3 Intensity -- 6.4 Summary -- 7. Discussion -- 7.1 A comparison of our results to Colantoni and Cuervo (2013) -- 7.2 Implications for a PW-internal (or external) phonological representation -- 7.3 Implications for a morphosyntactic analysis -- 8. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- On the simplification of a prosodic inventory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Literature review.
2.1 Theoretical framework -- 2.2 The intonational phonology of Spanish declaratives -- 3. Data collection and analysis -- 4. Findings -- 4.1 Prenuclear pitch accents -- 4.2 Nuclear configurations -- 4.2.1 Non-terminal ips -- 4.2.2 IP-nuclear configurations -- 5. A new proposal to account for the data -- 6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Segmental anchoring in Peruvian Amazonian Spanish intonation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous studies and motivation -- 2.1 Segmental Anchoring Hypothesis and Invariant Rise Hypothesis -- 2.2 Goals and research questions -- 3. Methodology -- 3.1 Dialect under study and participants -- 3.2 Task and procedure -- 3.3 Stimuli -- 3.4 Data analysis -- 4. Results -- 4.1 Effect of number of prosodic words in segmental duration -- 4.2 Tonal alignment in relation to the stressed syllable and the stressed vowel -- 4.3 Tonal alignment within the stressed vowel (as a percentage) -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- Appendix -- Target Sentences -- The prosody-pragmatics interface in the pragmaticalization of Hombre! as a discourse marker -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Types of prosodic research in pragmatics -- 1.2 Pragmaticalization & discourse markers -- 1.3 Previous literature of discourse marker hombre -- 2. Current study -- 2.1 Research questions -- 2.2 Participants & procedures -- 2.3 Methodology & measures -- 3. Results -- 3.1 Qualitative results: Discourse analysis -- 3.1.1 Attenuation -- 3.1.2 Reformulation -- 3.1.3 Reinforcement -- 3.2 Quantitative results -- 3.2.1 Phonetic analysis -- 3.2.1.1 Duration. Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category (attenuation, reformulation, reinforcement) on the two different temporal measures, relative syllable duration and abso.
3.2.1.2 Relative peak alignment. Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team, 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category on the spectral parameter of relative peak alignment. A one-way ANOVA, F(2,86) = 148.9, p <.001, indi -- 3.2.1.3 Syllable mean pitch difference. Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category on the spectral parameter of syllable mean pitch difference. As this measure was calculated by su -- 3.2.1.4 Pitch range (Hz). Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category on the spectral parameter of pitch range. A one-way ANOVA, F(2,86) = 3.83, p = 0.03, indicated a significant ma -- 3.2.1.5 Syllable mean intensity (dB) difference. Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category on the amplitudinal parameter of syllable mean intensity difference. As this measure was -- 3.2.1.6 Intensity range (dB). Statistical analysis was conducted using R (R Development Core Team 2010) to examine the impact of pragmatic category on the amplitudinal measure of intensity range (dB). Results indicated no significant effect of pragmatic c -- 3.2.1.7 Phonetic results summary. The acoustic measurements, taken together, illustrate a number of differences between the three previously identified pragmatic categories. Specifically, while there was no difference in the temporal elements of the diffe -- 3.2.2 Phonological analysis -- 4. Discussion -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Appendix -- Sample questions from semi-directed interview -- Sociolinguistic implications on perception -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Previous investigations -- 2.1 Research on the sociolinguistic influence on speech perception.
ISBN 9789027266453 (pdf)
902726645X (pdf)
9789027258113 (hb ; alk. paper)
9027258112
OCLC # 960281248
Additional Format Print version: Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (18th : 2014 : Purdue University). Inquiries in Hispanic linguistics. Amsterdam : Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, [2016] 9789027258113 (DLC) 2016030802



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