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Title Hearing aids / Gerald R. Popelka, Brian C.J. Moore, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors.
Imprint Switzerland : Springer, 2016.

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 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
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Series Springer handbook of auditory research, 0947-2657 ; volume 56
Springer handbook of auditory research ; v. 56. 0947-2657
Subject Hearing aids.
Hearing Aids.
Alt Name Popelka, Gerald R.,
Moore, Brian C. J.,
Fay, Richard R.,
Popper, Arthur N.,
LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
View online
Series Springer handbook of auditory research, 0947-2657 ; volume 56
Springer handbook of auditory research ; v. 56. 0947-2657
Subject Hearing aids.
Hearing Aids.
Alt Name Popelka, Gerald R.,
Moore, Brian C. J.,
Fay, Richard R.,
Popper, Arthur N.,
Description 1 online resource (xii, 333 pages) : illustrations (some color).
Contents Series Preface; Preface 1992; Volume Preface; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Introduction to Hearing Aids; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Population; 1.3 Technical Aspects of Hearing Aids; 1.3.1 Components of Hearing Aids; 1.3.2 Styles of Hearing Aids; 1.3.3 Closed and Open Fittings; 1.3.4 Batteries; 1.3.5 Transducers; 1.3.6 Signal Processing in Hearing Aids; 1.3.7 Wireless Connectivity and Power Requirements; 1.4 Perception of Sound via Hearing Aids; 1.4.1 Speech Perception; 1.4.2 Spatial Perception; 1.4.3 Music Perception; 1.5 Clinical Verification of Hearing Aid Performance.
1.6 Validation of Hearing Aid Performance1.7 Concluding Remarks; References; Chapter 2: Epidemiology of Hearing Impairment; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Definitions; 2.3 Prevalence; 2.3.1 Prevalence of Hearing Impairment in US Adolescents; 2.3.2 Prevalence of Hearing Impairment in US Adults; 2.3.3 Prevalence of Hearing Impairment in the Older US Population; 2.4 Incidence; 2.5 Rate of Threshold Change; 2.6 Risk Factors for Acquired Hearing Impairment; 2.6.1 Age; 2.6.2 Environment; 2.6.2.1 Noise Exposure; 2.6.2.2 Chemical Exposure; 2.6.2.3 Environmental Toxin Exposure; 2.6.2.4 Ototoxic Medications.
2.7 Genetic Predisposition2.7.1 Sex; 2.7.2 Skin and Eye Pigmentation; 2.8 Medical and Lifestyle Factors; 2.8.1 Infection; 2.8.2 Meniere's Disease; 2.8.3 Otosclerosis; 2.8.4 Cardiovascular Disease and CVD Risk Factors; 2.8.5 Obstructive Sleep Apnea; 2.8.6 Preeclampsia; 2.8.7 Hormonal Factors; 2.8.8 Dietary Factors; 2.8.9 Alcohol Intake; 2.8.10 Smoking and Tobacco Use; 2.8.11 Level of Education and Type of Occupation; 2.8.12 Hearing Impairment and Dementia; 2.9 Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; 2.10 Epidemiology of Pediatric Hearing Impairment; 2.10.1 Demographic Factors.
2.10.2 Genetics and Pediatric Hearing Impairment2.10.3 Congenital Hypothyroidism; References; Chapter 3: Hearing Aid Transducers; 3.1 Introduction-Historical Perspective; 3.2 Transducer Types; 3.2.1 Microphones; 3.2.1.1 Electret Microphones; 3.2.1.2 MEMS Microphones; 3.2.2 Receivers; 3.3 Transducer Performance Versus Size; 3.3.1 Omnimicrophones; 3.3.1.1 Frequency Response; 3.3.1.2 Maximum Undistorted Input SPL; 3.3.1.3 Noise; 3.3.1.4 Vibration Sensitivity; 3.3.2 Directional Microphones (Single Cartridge and Dual Microphone); 3.3.2.1 Effect of Location in Ear.
3.3.2.2 Effect of Microphone Mismatch in Dual-Microphone Designs3.3.2.3 Array Microphones; 3.3.3 Receivers; 3.3.3.1 Receiver Sensitivity Versus Size; 3.3.3.2 Frequency Response; 3.3.3.3 Allowable Distortion; 3.3.3.4 Maximum Output for Various Size Receivers; 3.3.4 Receiver Real-Ear and Coupler Measurements; 3.3.4.1 The 0.4-cc Coupler; 3.3.4.2 Universal Real-Ear to 0.4-cc Coupler Difference; 3.3.4.3 Real-Ear Effects on RECD; Normal Closed-Canal Fittings; Deep-Canal Fittings; Open-Canal or "Tube" Fittings; 3.3.5 Bone Conduction Receivers; 3.3.5.1 Load Impedance.
Summary This volume will serve as the first Handbook of its kind in the area of hearing aid research, often the least-defined, least-understood, part of the multi-disciplinary research process. Most scientific training is very advanced within the particular disciplines but provides little opportunity for systematic introduction to the issues and obstacles that prevent effective hearing-aid related research. This area has emerged as one of critical importance, as signified by a single specialized meeting (the International Hearing Aid Conference, IHCON) that brings together specialists from the disparate disciplines involved, including both university and industry researchers. Identification of the key steps that enable high-impact basic science to ultimately result in significant clinical advances that improve patient outcome is critical. This volume will provide an overview of current key issues in hearing aid research from the perspective of many different disciplines, not only from the perspective of the key funding agencies, but also from the scientists and clinicians who are currently involved in hearing aid research. It will offer insight into the experience, current technology and future technology that can help improve hearing aids, as scientists and clinicians typically have little or no formal training over the whole range of the individual disciplines that are relevant. The selection and coverage of topics insures that it will have lasting impact, well beyond immediate, short-term, or parochial concerns.
Note Online resource; title from PDF title page (SpringerLink, viewed September 28, 2016).
ISBN 9783319330365 (electronic bk.)
3319330365 (electronic bk.)
9783319330341 (print)
ISBN/ISSN 10.1007/978-3-319-33036-5
OCLC # 959371350



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