Return to home page
Searching: Muskingum library catalog
Some OPAL libraries remain closed or are operating at reduced service levels. Materials from those libraries may not be requestable; requested items may take longer to arrive. Note that pickup procedures may differ between libraries. Please contact your library for new procedures, specific requests, or other assistance.
  Previous Record Previous Item Next Item Next Record
  Reviews, Summaries, etc...
EBOOK
Author Cragg, Peter J.
Title Supramolecular chemistry : from biological inspiration to biomedical applications / by Peter J. Cragg.
Imprint Dordrecht ; London : Springer, 2010.

LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
View online
LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
View online
Author Cragg, Peter J.
Subject Supramolecular chemistry.
Description 1 online resource
polychrome rdacc
Contents Note continued: 3.3.2. Boxes with Metal Hinges -- 3.3.3. Capsules as Reaction Flasks -- 3.3.4. More Complex Geometries -- 3.4. Synthetic Cells -- 3.4.1. Capsules with Mineral Walls -- 3.4.2. Polymer Based Capsules -- 3.4.3. Lipid Capsules -- 3.4.4. Capsid Virus Mimetics -- 3.5. Towards a Minimal Synthetic Cell -- 3.6. Cellular Aggregation -- 3.7. Summary -- References -- 4.1. Enzymes -- 4.2. Metal Complexes as Enzyme Mimics -- 4.3. Enzymes and Their Supramolecular Analogues -- 4.3.1. Haemoglobin, Myoglobin and Their Models -- 4.3.2. Cytochromes -- 4.3.3. Protection from Radicals: Catalytic Pro- and Antioxidants -- 4.3.4. Copper-Containing Enzymes -- 4.3.5. Zinc-Containing Enzymes -- 4.3.6. Photosynthesis and Artificial Leaves -- 4.3.7. Cyclodextrins as Artificial Enzyme Supports -- 4.3.8. Model Enzymes that do not Require Metals -- 4.3.9. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers -- 4.3.10. Combinatorial Polymers -- 4.3.11. Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries -- 4.4. De novo Design and Evolutionary Development of Enzymes -- 4.5. Summary -- References -- 5.1. Cells and Their Membranes -- 5.1.1. Cell Membranes -- 5.1.2. Transmembrane Migration: Molecular Shuttles -- 5.2. Transmembrane Channels: Selectivity and Gating Mechanisms -- 5.2.1. Voltage Gating -- 5.2.2. Ligand Gating -- 5.2.3. Gating by Aggregation. -- 5.2.4. Gating by p1-1 and Membrane Tension -- 5.2.5. Light Gating -- 5.3. Channel Architecture -- 5.3.1. Channels for Neutral Molecules -- 5.3.2. Anion Channels -- 5.3.3. Cation Channels -- 5.4. Structural Determination -- 5.5. Measuring Channel Activity -- 5.5.1. Voltage Clamping -- 5.5.2. Patch Clamping -- 5.5.3. Bilayer Methods -- 5.5.4. Dye Release Methods -- 5.5.5. NMR Methods -- 5.6. Transmembrane Transport by Artificial Systems -- 5.6.1. Transporters -- 5.6.2. Channel-Forming Systems.
Note continued: 5.7. Summary -- References -- 6.1. Applications of Supramolecular Chemistry in Medical Diagnostics -- 6.2. Design Principles -- 6.3. Supramolecular Sensors -- 6.3.1. Optical and Fluorescent Biosensors -- 6.3.2. Electrochemical Sensors -- 6.4. Macrocyclic Complexes for Imaging -- 6.5. In vivo Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents -- 6.6. Other Supramolecular Sensors -- 6.7. Summary -- References -- 7.1. Therapeutic Applications of Supramolecular Chemistry -- 7.2. Chelation Therapy -- 7.2.1. Desferrioxamine -- 7.2.2. Copper Imbalance: Wilson's Disease and Menke's Syndrome -- 7.3. Macrocyclic Complexes for Radiotherapy -- 7.4. Photodynamic Therapy -- 7.5. Texaphyrins -- 7.6. Targeting Cancer with Peptides -- 7.7. Drug Delivery and Controlled Release -- 7.8. Cyclams as Anti-HIV Agents -- 7.9. Supramolecular Solution to Alzheimer's Disease? -- 7.10. Calixarenes as Therapeutic Agents -- 7.11. Supramolecular Antibiotics -- 7.12. Summary -- References -- 8.1. Bionanotechnology -- 8.2. Unnatural Chemistry of DNA -- 8.3. Molecular Muscles -- 8.4. Nanomedicine -- 8.4.1. Labelling with Nanoparticles -- 8.4.2. DNA Fingerprinting -- 8.4.3. Full Genome Sequencing -- 8.4.4. DNA Sequencing in Real Time -- 8.4.5. Therapeutic Multimodal Nanoparticles -- 8.5. Cell Mimics as Drug Delivery Vehicles -- 8.5.1. Polymer Encapsulated siRNA Delivery -- 8.5.2. Drug Delivery by Particle Disintegration -- 8.5.3. Minicells as Drug Delivery Systems -- 8.6. Supramolecular Protein Engineering -- 8.7. Antimicrobial Limpet Mines -- 8.8. Future Directions -- 8.8.1. Medicinal Nanodevices -- 8.8.2. Powering Nanodevices -- 8.8.3. Functional Nanodevices -- 8.8.4. Verification of Treatment -- 8.8.5. Nanodevice Control -- 8.9. Supramolecular Chemistry and Nanomedicine -- References.
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary Supramolecular chemistry is often described as the study of chemistry beyond the simple molecular level yet it is often forgotten how many of the pioneering su-pramolecular chemists looked to molecular biology for their ideas. The search for an aldolase enzyme mimic, the discovery of crown ethers that transported potas-sium as efficiently as valinomycin, and the synthesis of an antitubercular com-pound that resembled a transmembrane protein, all point to a biological inspira-tion. Since the field emerged in the last quarter of the 20th Century, advances in the synthesis of multifunctional molecules, coupled to a greater understanding of biological processes at the molecular level, have led supramolecular chemists to design compounds that not only mimic those in Nature but also have diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The book opens with an overview of supramolecular chemistry. In subsequent chapters parallels are drawn with biological phenomena: the formation of proteins and other biomolecules, the evolution of cells, and the design of channel-forming molecules and enzymes. The application of supramolecular principles to sensors and magic bullet therapies is explained and the future of supramolecular therapeutics is considered. The exciting combination of supramolecular chemistry and nanotechnology is discussed together with the likelihood that nanoengineered smart materials could one day circulate in the body to treat patients before they became aware of any symptoms. Supramolecular Chemistry: From Biological Inspiration to Biomedical Applications is aimed at postgraduates working at the chemistry/life science interface and final year undergraduate advanced options in supramolecular chemistry. It is hoped that it will also be of value to academics and professionals interested in the relevance of supramolecular chemistry to biology and vice versa.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9789048125821
9048125820
9789048125814
9048125812
ISBN/ISSN 10.1007/978-90-481-2582-1
Publisher # 12099603
OCLC # 668096773
Additional Format Print version: Cragg, Peter J. Supramolecular chemistry. Dordrecht ; London : Springer, 2010 9789048125814 9048125812


If you experience difficulty accessing or navigating this content, please contact the OPAL Support Team