Return to home page
Searching: Otterbein library catalog
  Previous Record Previous Item Next Item Next Record
  Reviews, Summaries, etc...
EBOOK
Title Seafood processing by-products : trends and applications / Se-kwon Kim, editor.
Imprint New York : Springer, [2014]
2014

LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
View online
LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK SPRINGER EBOOKS    ONLINE  
View online
Subject Fishery processing -- By-products.
Alt Name Kim, Se-Kwon,
Description 1 online resource
polychrome rdacc http://rdaregistry.info/termList/RDAColourContent/1003
Summary The seafood processing industry produces a large amount of by-products that usually consist of bioactive materials such as proteins, enzymes, fatty acids, and biopolymers. These by-products are often underutilized or wasted, even though they have been shown to have biotechnological, nutritional, pharmaceutical, and biomedical applications. For example, by-products derived from crustaceans and algae have been successfully applied in place of collagen and gelatin in food, cosmetics, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. Divided into four parts and consisting of twenty-seven chapters, this book discusses seafood by-product development, isolation, and characterization, and demonstrates the importance of seafood by-products for the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and biomedical industries. About the Editor Professor Se-Kwon Kim, Ph. D., is director of the Marine Process Research Center (MBPRC) and a distinguished professor in the graduate school of marine biotechnology at Pukyong National University in the Republic of Korea. His major research interests are the investigation and development of bioactive substances derived from marine organisms, and their application in eastern medicine, nutraceuticals, and cosmeceuticals via marine bioprocessing and mass-production technologies.
Contents Introduction to seafood processing by-products -- Trends in use of seafood processing by-products in Europe -- Prospective utilization of fishery by-products in Indonesia -- Development of functional materials from seafood by-products by membrane separation technology -- Processing and characterization of salt-fermented fish (Jeotgal) using seafood by-products in Korea -- Isoelectric Solubilization/Precipitation as a Means to Recover Protein and Lipids from Seafood By-products -- Advances in processing of marine discard & by-products -- Recovery of gelatin with improved functionality from seafood processing waste -- Utilization of fish waste for the making fish sauce -- Enzymes from fish processing waste materials and their commercial applications -- Functional proteins and peptides from Fish Skin -- Seafood processing by-products -- collagen and gelatin -- Bycatch utilization in Asia -- Biological, Physical and Chemical Properties of Fish Oil and Industrial Applications -- Use of Seafood Processing By-products in Animal Feed Industry -- Potential use of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products -- Chitin and its beneficial activity as an immunomodulator in allergic reaction -- Chitosan Nanoparticles: Preparation, Characterization and Applications -- Chitin, Chitosan and Their Derivatives against Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Some Application -- Lipid bodies isolated microalgae residues as a source for bio-ethanol production -- Bioactive metabolites and value added products from marine macroalgae -- The application of fish collagen to the dental and hard tissue regenerative medicine -- Applications of seafood by-products in the food industry and human nutrition -- Anti-diabetic and obesity effect of materials from seafood by-products -- Bioluminescence isolated from seafood by-products and its applications -- Preparation of useful components from marine algal processing by-products and their applications -- Functional properties of ascidians by-products: nutritional and medicinal value.
1. Introduction to Seafood Processing By-products -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Fish By-products -- 2.1. Protein -- 2.2. Peptides -- 2.3. Collagen and Gelatin -- 2.4. Fish Oil -- 3. Crustaceans By-products -- 3.1. Chitin and Chitosan -- 3.2. Application of Chitin and Chitosan -- 4. Seaweed By-products and Their Applications -- 5. Organization of This Book's Chapters -- -- 2. Trends in the Use of Seafood Processing By-products in Europe -- 1. Background -- 1.1. Aquaculture -- 1.2. Wild Fisheries -- 2. By-product Production by Waste Utilization -- 2.1. Fish Meal and Fish Oil -- 2.2. Enzymatic Hydrolysate -- 2.3. Alternative By-product Production -- 3. Seafood Waste Treatment and By-product Utilization in Some European Countries -- 3.1. Norway -- 3.2. Spain -- 3.3. Ireland -- 3.4. Denmark -- -- 3. Prospective Utilization of Fishery By-products in Indonesia -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Fishery By-products -- 3. The Utilization of By-products -- 3.1. The Utilization of By-products from Shrimp Trawl -- 3.1.1. Minced Fish and Surimi -- 3.1.2. Food-Grade Fish Flour -- 3.1.3. Fish Meal for Feed -- 3.1.4. Fish Silage -- 3.1.5. Traditional Products -- 3.2. The Utilization of By-products from Fisheries Processing Industries -- 3.2.1. By-product of Shrimp Processing Industries -- 3.2.2. By-product from Fish Canning -- 3.2.3. By-product from Tuna Loin Processing -- 3.2.4. By-product from Red Snapper Processing -- 3.2.5. By-product from Frog Leg Processing -- 3.2.6. By-product from Freshwater Fish Processing -- 3.2.7. By-product from Traditional Products Processing -- 3.3. The Utilization of By-products from Secondary Products -- 3.3.1. Fish Oil in Pharmaceutical Industries -- 3.3.2. Fish Oil in Food Industries -- 3.3.3. Fish Oil in Feed Industries -- 3.3.4. Fish Oil in Non-food Industries -- 3.4. Shark and Rays Utilization -- 3.4.1. Shark -- 3.4.2. Rays -- 4. Challenges -- -- 4. Development of Functional Materials from Seafood By-products by Membrane Separation Technology -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Membrane Separation Technology -- 2.1. Mechanisms of Membrane Filtration -- 2.2. Classification of Membrane Technologies -- 2.3. Membrane Bioreactor Systems -- 3. Application of Membrane Separation in Marine Biotechnology -- 3.1. Devices for the Separation of Bioactive Peptides on Membrane Reactor Processes -- 3.1.1. Antihypertensive Peptides -- 3.1.2. Antioxidant Peptides -- 3.1.3. Other Bioactivities -- 3.2. Production of Fish Oil -- 3.2.1. Enzymatic Modification of Fish Oil -- 3.2.2. Fish Oil O/W Emulsions Produced by Membrane Emulsification -- 3.3. β-Secretase Inhibitory Activity of Chitosan and Its Derivatives -- 3.4. Fisheries Processing Wastewater -- 3.4.1. Concentration of Wastewater by Membranes -- 3.4.2. Desalination of Wastewater by Electrodialysis Membranes -- 4. Conclusion -- -- 5. Processing and Characterization of Salt-Fermented Fish (Jeotgal) Using Seafood By-products in Korea -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Classification and Output of Jeotgal -- 2.1. Classification -- 2.1.1. Classification by Parts and Kinds of Fishery Used -- 2.1.2. Classification by Salinity of Jeotgal -- 2.2. Output of Jeotgal -- 3. Kinds of Seafood Processing By-products -- 4. Processing of By-product Jeotgal -- 4.1. Viscera Jeotgal -- 4.1.1. Low-Salt Fermented Intestine and Stomach of Alaska Pollock (Changran Jeotgal) -- 4.1.2. Other Viscera Jeotgal -- 4.2. Roe Jeotgal -- 4.2.1. Low-Salt Fermented and Seasoned Roe of Alaska Pollock (Myungran Jeotgal) -- 4.2.2. Salt-Fermented Sea Urchin Roe (Sea Urchin Roe Jeotgal) -- 4.3. Salt-Fermented Pacific Cod Gill (Pacific Cod Gill Jeotgal) -- 5. Microbiological Characterization of By-product Jeotgal -- 6. Biochemical Characterization and Shelf Life of By-product Jeotgal -- 6.1. Viscera Jeotgal -- 6.1.1. Low-Salt Fermented Intestine and Stomach of Alaska Pollock (Changran Jeotgal) -- 6.1.2. Salt-Fermented Chub Mackerel Viscera (Chub Mackerel Viscera Jeotgal) -- 6.1.3. Salt-Fermented Largehead Hairtail Viscera (Largehead Hairtail Viscera Jeotgal) -- 6.1.4. Salt-Fermented Konoshiro Gizzard Shad Stomach (Konoshiro Gizzard Shad Stomach jeotgal) -- 6.1.5. Salt-Fermented Sea Cucumber Viscera (Sea Cucumber Viscera Jeotgal) -- 6.1.6. Salt-Fermented Abalone Viscera (Abalone Viscera Jeotgal) -- 6.2. Roe Jeotgal -- 6.2.1. Salt-Fermented Alaska Pollock Roe (Myungran Jeotgal) -- 6.2.2. Salt-Fermented Sea Urchin Roe (Sea Urchin Roe Jeotgal) -- 6.2.3. Salt-Fermented Pacific Cod Gill (Pacific Cod Gill Jeotgal) -- 7. Safety of By-product Jeotgal -- 8. Conclusion -- -- 6. Isoelectric Solubilization/Precipitation as a Means to Recover Protein and Lipids from Seafood By-products -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Definitions of Seafood By-products -- 3. Opportunities for the Development of Protein and Lipid Recovery Technology from Seafood By-products -- 4. Fundamental Properties of Seafood Lipids -- 5. Fundamental Properties of Seafood Proteins -- 5.1. Myofibrillar Proteins -- 5.2. Sarcoplasmic Proteins -- 5.3. Stroma Proteins -- 5.4. Isoelectric Behavior of Seafood Muscle Proteins -- 5.5. Protein Recovery Yield and Fat Recovery Yield from Seafood By-products -- 5.6. Recovery of Functional Proteins and Lipids from Seafood Processing By-products by Isoelectric Solubilization/Precipitation at the Pilot Scale -- 6. Continuous Bioreactor System for Seafood Processing By-products -- 7. Alternative Applications of Recovered Proteins -- 8. Future Market Trends -- 9. Conclusions -- -- 7. Advances in the Processing of Marine Discard and By-products -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Reasons for Discarding Fish -- 3. By-product Categories -- 4. Strategies for Fish Protein Recovery from By-product Material -- 5. Fish Protein Concentrates (FPC) -- 6. Chemical and Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Fish Protein -- 7. Autolysis -- 8. Processing of Stickwater -- 9. Collagen and Gelatine Extraction -- 9.1. Collagen and Gelatine Applications -- 9.2. Adhesive Applications -- 9.3. Gelling Applications -- 9.4. Gelatine Use as an Anti-foam Agent -- 9.5. Protective Colloid/Crystal Modifying Properties of Collagen/Gelatine -- 9.6. Gelatine as a Nutritional Supplement -- 9.7. Gelatine as a Texture Agent -- 9.8. Polyelectrolyte Properties of Gelatine -- 9.9. Use of Collagen as a Beauty and Cosmetic Product Ingredient -- 9.10. Bioactive Peptides from Marine By-products -- 9.11. Antihypertensive and ACE-I Inhibition of Marine Peptides -- 9.12. Antioxidant Activities -- -- 8. Recovery of Gelatin with Improved Functionality from Seafood Processing Waste -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Sources of Gelatin -- 3. Gelatin from Seafood Processing Waste -- 4. Gelatin Production -- 4.1. Pretreatment of Raw Material -- 4.2. Extraction of Fish Gelatin -- 4.3. Method of Grossman and Bergman (1992) -- 4.4. Method of Gudmundsson and Hafsteinsson (1997) -- 4.5. Method of Gomez-Guillen and Montero (2001) -- 4.6. Method of Gimenez et al. (2005) -- 4.7. Method of Zhou and Regenstein (2005) -- 4.8. Method of Liu et al. (2008) -- 4.9. Method of Koodziejska et al. (2008) -- 4.10. Method of Rahman et al. (2008) -- 4.11. Method of Benjakul et al. (2009) -- 4.12. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Fish Gelatin -- 5. Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 5.1. Gelation Behavior of Fish Gelatin -- 5.2. Emulsifying Capacity of Fish Gelatin -- 5.3. Film Formation Ability of Fish Gelatin -- 6. Recovery of Fish Gelatin with Improved Functionality -- 6.1. Effect of Resource (Cold Water/Warm Water) and Season on the Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 6.2. Effect of Sample Preservation on the Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 6.3. Effect of Extraction Method on the Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 6.4. Effect of High Pressure on the Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 6.5. Effect of Bleaching on the Functionality of Fish Gelatin -- 7. Optimization of Extraction Variables for Improved Functional Properties -- 7.1. Response Surface Methodology -- 8. Improvement of Functional Properties of Extracted Gelatin -- 9. Conclusions.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9781461495901 (electronic bk.)
1461495903 (electronic bk.)
9781461495895
146149589X
ISBN/ISSN 10.1007/978-1-4614-9590-1
OCLC # 876846725
Additional Format Print version: Seafood Processing By-products 9781461495895 (OCoLC)861216239