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EBOOK
Author Beard-Moose, Christina Taylor.
Title Public Indians, private Cherokees : tourism and tradition on tribal ground / Christina Taylor Beard-Moose.
Imprint Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, [2009]
©2009

Author Beard-Moose, Christina Taylor.
Series Contemporary American Indian studies
Contemporary American Indian studies.
Subject Cherokee Indians -- Industries.
Cherokee Indians -- Economic conditions.
Cherokee Indians -- Attitudes.
Heritage tourism -- Economic aspects -- North Carolina.
Culture and tourism -- North Carolina.
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians -- History.
Description 1 online resource (viii, 185 pages) : illustrations, maps.
polychrome rdacc
Note digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references (pages 155-179) and index.
Contents Researching the obvious : tourism and the Eastern Cherokee -- The trail of tourism -- Academic perspectives on tourism and the case of Cherokee, North Carolina -- Eastern Cherokee ingenuity -- Disneyfication on the boundary -- Mass tourism's effects on indigenous communities -- Epilogue : an Eastern Cherokee renaissance.
Summary A major economic industry among American Indian tribes is the public promotion and display of aspects of their cultural heritage in a wide range of tourist venues. Few do it better than the Eastern Band of the Cherokee, whose homeland is the Qualla Boundary of North Carolina. Through extensive research into the work of other scholars dating back to the late 1800s, and interviews with a wide range of contemporary Cherokees, Beard-Moose presents the two faces of the Cherokee people. One is the public face that populates the powwows, dramatic presentations, museums, and myriad roadside craft locations. The other is the private face whose homecoming, Indian fairs, traditions, belief system, community strength, and cultural heritage are threatened by the very activities that put food on their tables. Constructing an ethnohistory of tourism and comparing the experiences of the Cherokee with the Florida Seminoles and Southwestern tribes, this work brings into sharp focus the fine line between promoting and selling Indian culture.
Access Use copy Restrictions unspecified star
Reproduction Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011.
System Details Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9780817381158 (electronic bk.)
0817381155 (electronic bk.)
9780817316341 (cloth ; alk. paper)
0817316345 (cloth ; alk. paper)
9780817355135 (pbk. ; alk. paper)
0817355138 (pbk. ; alk. paper)
OCLC # 647930709
Additional Format Print version: Beard-Moose, Christina Taylor. Public Indians, private Cherokees. Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, ©2009 9780817316341 (DLC) 2008021836 (OCoLC)229033121


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