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COMPUTER FILE
Author Brandeis, Thomas James.
Title Equations for merchantable volume for subtropical moist and wet forests of Puerto Rico / Thomas J. Brandeis, Olaf Kuegler, and Steven A. Knowe.
Imprint Asheville, NC : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station, [2005]

LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 ONLINE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATION  A 13.78:SRS-39    ONLINE  
LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 ONLINE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATION  A 13.78:SRS-39    ONLINE  
Author Brandeis, Thomas James.
Series Research paper SRS ; 39
Research paper SRS ; 39.
Subject Forests and forestry -- Puerto Rico -- Measurement -- Mathematical models.
Alt Name Kuegler, Olaf.
Knowe, Steven A.
United States. Forest Service. Southern Research Station.
Description iii,15 pages : digital, PDF file.
monochrome rdacc
System Details Mode of access: Internet from the Forest Service web site. Address as of 5/21/07: http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/rp/rp%5Fsrs039.pdf ; current access is available via PURL.
Note Title from Web page (viewed on May 4, 2006).
"November 2005"--T.p. verso.
Summary "In Puerto Rico, where locally grown woods are primarily used for furniture and crafts production, estimation of wood volume makes it possible to estimate the monetary value of one of the many commodities and services forests provide to society. In the Puerto Rican forest inventories of 1980 and 1990, workers calculated stem volume directly by applying geometric formulae to bole sections of merchantable trees. Field crews recorded several diameter and height measurements along the bole of each tree. If tree volume estimates were based on fewer tree measurements, this would significantly increase field crew productivity. For this reason, tree volume equations have been derived from Puerto Rican forest inventory data by directly calculating stem volume, then creating regression equations that estimate inside and outside bark merchantable stem volume from tree diameter at breast height and total height."--P. [1].
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references (p. 13-14).
OCLC # 70151890


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