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EBOOK
Author Steinbock-Pratt, Sarah, 1982-
Title Educating the empire : American teachers and contested colonization in the Philippines / Sarah Steinbock-Pratt, University of Alabama.
Imprint Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 2019.
2019.

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LOCATION CALL # STATUS MESSAGE
 OHIOLINK CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS    ONLINE  
View online
Author Steinbock-Pratt, Sarah, 1982-
Series Cambridge studies in US foreign relations.
Cambridge studies in US foreign relations.
Subject Education -- Philippines -- History -- 20th century.
Teachers -- Philippines -- History -- 20th century.
Americans -- Philippines -- History -- 20th century.
Imperialism -- Social aspects -- Philippines -- History.
Philippines -- History -- 1898-1946.
United States -- Relations -- Philippines.
Philippines -- Relations -- United States.
Description 1 online resource (xii, 327 pages) : illustrations.
polychrome rdacc
Summary This book examines how education contributed to the creation of US empire in the Philippines by focusing on American teachers and the Filipinos with whom they lived and worked. While education was located at the heart of the imperial project, used to justify empire, the implementation of schooling in the islands deviated from the expectations of the colonial state. American teachers at times upheld, adapted, circumvented, or entirely disregarded colonial policy. Despite the language of white masculinity that imbued imperial discourse, the appointment of white women and black men as teachers allowed them to claim roles and identities that transformed understandings of gender and race. Filipinos also used the American educational system to articulate their own understandings of empire. In this context, schools were a microcosm for the colonial state, with contestations over education often standing in for the colonial relationship itself
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents Creating a catalog of colonial knowledge -- A civil empire: determining fitness for colonial education -- Professionals and pioneers: teachers' self-depiction in empire -- Recreating race: evolving notions of whiteness and blackness in empire -- A political education: Americans, Filipinos, and the meanings of instructino -- All politics is local: American teachers and their communities -- Speaking for ourselves: dignity and the politics of student protest
Note Print version record
ISBN 9781108597357 (electronic bk.)
1108597351 (electronic bk.)
9781108666961 (electronic book)
1108666965 (electronic book)
9781108473125 (hardcover)
1108473121 (hardcover)
9781108461009 (paperback)
110846100X (paperback)
OCLC # 1098279706
Additional Format Print version: Steinbock-Pratt, Sarah, 1982- Educating the empire. Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 2019 9781108473125 (DLC) 2018052004 (OCoLC)1083158464.


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