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EBOOK
Title From Dar es Salaam to Bongoland : urban mutations in Tanzania / Urafiki Collection ; coordinated by Bernard Calas.
Imprint Paris : Karthala ; Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania : Mkuki Na Nyota Publishers ; Nairobi, Kenya : French Institute for Research in Africa, [2010]

Subject Cities and towns -- Tanzania.
Urbanization -- Tanzania.
Alt Name Calas, Bernard.
Collectif Urafiki.
Uniform Title De Dar es Salaam à Bongoland. English.
Description 1 online resource (411 pages) : illustrations
polychrome rdacc
Note Translated from the French.
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references.
Summary The name Dar es Salaam comes from the Arabic phrase meaning house of peace. A popular but erroneous translation is 'haven of peace' resulting from a mix-up of the Arabic words "dar" (house) and "bandar" (harbour). Named in 1867 by the Sultan of Zanzibar, the town has for a long time benefitted from a reputation of being a place of tranquility. The tropical drowsiness is a comfort to the socialist poverty and under-equipment that causes an unending anxiety to reign over the town. Today, for the Tanzanian, the town has become Bongoland, that is, a place where survival is a matter of cunning and intelligence (bongo means 'brain' in Kiswahili). Far from being an anecdote, this slide into toponomy records the mutations that affect the links that Tanzanians maintain with their principal city and the manner in which it represents them. The name Dar es Salaam comes from the Arabic phrase meaning house of peace. A popular but erroneous translation is 'haven of peace' resulting from a mix-up of the Arabic words "dar" (house) and "bandar" (harbour). Named in 1867 by the Sultan of Zanzibar, the town has for a long time benefitted from a reputation of being a place of tranquility. The tropical drowsiness is a comfort to the socialist poverty and under-equipment that causes an unending anxiety to reign over the town. Today, for the Tanzanian, the town has become Bongoland, that is, a place where survival is a matter of cunning and intelligence (bongo means 'brain' in Kiswahili). Far from being an anecdote, this slide into toponomy records the mutations that affect the links that Tanzanians maintain with their principal city and the manner in which it represents them. As territorialisation can only occur through frequenting, management and localised investment, it is therefore through certain places - first shelter and residential area, then the school, daladala station, the fire hydrant and the quays - that the town is observed. This led to broach the question in the geographical sense of urban policy carried out since German colonisation to date. At the same time, the analysis of these developments allows for an evaluation of the role of the urban crisis and the responses it brings. In sum, the aim of this approach is to measure the impact of the uniqueness of the place on the current changes. On one hand, this is linked to its long-term insertion in the Swahili civilisation, and on the other, to its colonisation by Germany and later Britain and finally, to the singularity of the post-colonial path. This latter is marked by an alternation of Ujamaa with Structural Adjustment Plans applied since 1987. How does this remarkable political culture take part in the emerging city today? This book is a translation of De Dar es Salaam à Bongoland: Mutations urbaines en Tanzanie, published by Karthala, Paris in 2006.
Contents Machine generated contents note: SECTION ONE LAND HISTORY -- DOMESTICATION OF THE AGGLOMERATION -- Evolution of Dar es Salaam's Peri-Urban Space during the period of German Colonisation (1890-1914) / Franck Raimbault -- Public Housing Policies: Decentralization, government policies and the peoples solutions / Marie Ange Goux -- Mixity and Territoriality in a Rapidly Expanding City: How Dar es Salaam was shaped by its Suburbs / Adrienne Polomack -- SECTION TWO MANAGING SPACE -- BETWEEN PLACES AND LINKS -- Schools: facilities and places structuring urbanity in Dar es Salaam Cecile Roy -- Urban Transport: following the course of free enterprise / Lourdes Diaz Olveira -- Towards a two-tiered city? / Pascal Pochet -- Water Management: Institutional weaknesses and urban answers: towards a new urbanity? / Valerie Messer -- SECTION THREE HORIZONS AND EXCHANGED GLANCES -- Harbour Landscapes / Bernard Calas -- Cultural Landscapes: Sedimentation, fusion or mutations? / Bernard Calas -- Dar es Salaam -- Zanzibar: exchanging glances / Jeremie Robert -- Zanzibari Investments in Kariakoo / Mohamed Ahmed Saleh -- Confusing views: from a wealth of representations to a "polyphonic city" / Bernard Calas.
Note Print version record.
ISBN 9789987081288 (electronic bk.)
9987081282 (electronic bk.)
9987102697 (electronic bk.)
9789987102693 (electronic bk.)
1283004968
9781283004961
9987080944
9789987080946
OCLC # 778567991
Additional Format Print version: De Dar es Salaam à Bongoland. English. From Dar es Salaam to Bongoland. Paris : Karthala ; Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania : Mkuki Na Nyota Publishers ; Nairobi, Kenya : French Institute for Research in Africa [2010] 9987080944 (OCoLC)693156805


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