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EBOOK
Author McGinn, Thomas A. J.
Title Prostitution, sexuality, and the law in ancient Rome / Thomas A.J. McGinn.
Imprint New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.

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Author McGinn, Thomas A. J.
Subject Prostitution (Roman law)
Prostitution -- Rome.
Prostitutes -- Rome -- Social conditions.
Description 1 online resource (xvi, 416 pages)
Bibliography Note Includes bibliographical references (pages 349-390) and indexes.
Summary "This book is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution in Rome from approximately 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in the profession, with close attention to their social context. The main focus of the study is to evaluate the extent to which the legal and political authorities were able to adapt this aspect of the legal system to the needs of contemporary society; in other words, it aims to explore the "fit" between the legal system and the socioeconomic reality. The book also attempts to shed light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, especially the status of women." "This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of classical studies, women's studies, and gender studies."--Jacket.
Note Print version record.
Contents Abbreviations; Chapter 1 Introduction: Law in Society; 1. Design of the Book; 2. Law in Society; 3. Problems with Nonlegal Evidence; 4. Honor and Shame; 5. Marginal Status; 6. Defining Prostitution; 7. Prostitution, Sexuality, and the Law; Chapter 2 Civic Disabilities: The Status of Prostitutes and Pimps as Roman Citizens; 1. Women and Citizenship; 2. Religious, Political, and Civic Disabilities Imposed on Prostitutes and Pimps; 3. Disabilities at Law; 4. The Core of Infamia and the Community of Honor; Chapter 3 The Lex Iulia et Papia; 1. The Statute
2. Marriage with Prostitutes before Augustus3. The Terms of the Lex Iulia et Papia regarding Marriage with Practitioners of Prostitution; 4. Marriage Practice and Possibilities; Chapter 4 Emperors, Jurists, and the Lex Iulia et Papia; 1. History of the Statute; 2. Subsequent Legislation; 3. Juristic Interpretation; Chapter 5 The Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis; 1. The Statute; 2. The Status of the Mater Familias; 3. The Adultera as Prostitute; 4. Lenocinium; 5. Exemptions; 6. Pimps, Prostitutes, and the Ius Occidendi; 7. Social Policy and the Lex Iulia on Adultery
Chapter 6 Emperors, Jurists, and the Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis1. History of the Statute; 2. Subsequent Legislation; 3. Juristic Interpretation; 4. The Law on Adultery and the Policymaking Elite; Chapter 7 The Taxation of Roman Prostitutes; 1. Taxing Prostitution; 2. The Evidence for Caligula's Introduction of the Tax; 3. Caligula's Motives for Introducing the Tax; 4. Methods of Collection; 5. The Rate of the Tax; 6. Criticism of the Tax; 7. Fictional Criticism and Later History of the Tax; 8. Two Special Cases: Egypt and Palmyra; 9. Profitability, Legitimacy, and Social Control
Chapter 8 Ne Serva Prostituatur: Restrictive Covenants in the Sale of Slaves1. Public Policy and Private Law; 2. Four Covenants; 3. Migration and Manumission; 4. Ne Serva Prostituatur: History; 5. Ne Serva and Prostitution; 6. Ne Serva and Slavery; 7. Honor and Shame; 8. Humanitas and Policy; Chapter 9 Prostitution and the Law of the Jurists; 1. Private Law and Prostitution; 2. Damaged Goods: Fiducia/Pledge; 3. Good Money after Bad: Inheritance, Mandate, and Usucapio in Sale; 4. An Honest Day's Wage: Condictio
5. Coveting Thy Neighbor's Harlot: Theft and Wrongful Appropriation of Slave Prostitutes6. All Honorable Men: The Petitio Hereditatis, Compromissum, and Operae; 7. Sexual Harassment: Iniuria; 8. Diamonds Are Forever: Donatio; Chapter 10 Conclusion: Diversity and Unity in Roman Legal Perspectives on Prostitution; 1. Summary of Findings; 2. Prostitution and the Law; 3. Public Policy; 4. Society and Law; 5. Unity in Diversity; Bibliography; Index of Sources; Index of Persons; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; Z; Index of Subjects; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L
Note English.
ISBN 0585304882 (electronic bk.)
9780585304885 (electronic bk.)
0195161327
9780195161328
9780195087857
0195087852
1280532653
9781280532658
9780199789344
0199789347
0195087852 (alk. paper)
9786611196578
6611196579
1281196576
9781281196576
9786610532650
6610532656
1602569363
9781602569362
OCLC # 45727761
Additional Format Print version: McGinn, Thomas A. Prostitution, sexuality, and the law in ancient Rome. New York : Oxford University Press, 1998 0195087852 (DLC) 97017435 (OCoLC)37001716
Table of Contents
 Abbreviations 
Ch. 1Introduction: Law in Society3
Ch. 2Civic Disabilities: The Status of Prostitutes and Pimps as Roman Citizens21
Ch. 3The Lex Iulia et Papia70
Ch. 4Emperors, Jurists, and the Lex Iulia et Papia105
Ch. 5The Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis140
Ch. 6Emperors, Jurists, and the Lex Iulia de Adulteriis Coercendis216
Ch. 7The Taxation of Roman Prostitutes248
Ch. 8Ne Serva Prostituatur: Restrictive Covenants in the Sale of Slaves288
Ch. 9Prostitution and the Law of the Jurists320
Ch. 10Conclusion: Diversity and Unity in Roman Legal Perspectives on Prostitution338
 Bibliography349
 Index of Sources391
 Index of Persons403
 Index of Subjects408


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